November 24, 2017
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9 Award-Winning Microscopic Photos Will Make You Rethink How You See The World

Microscopic mold never looked so beautiful

By Kate Ryan


First place: Four-day-old zebrafish embryo (10x) by Dr. Oscar Ruiz

First place: Four-day-old zebrafish embryo (10x) by Dr. Oscar Ruiz

 

Second place: Polished slab of Teepee Canyon agate (90x) by Douglas L. Moore

Second place: Polished slab of Teepee Canyon agate (90x) by Douglas L. Moore

 

Third place: Brain cells from skin cells—specifically, a culture of neurons (stained green) derived from human skin cells, and Schwann cells, a second type of brain cell (stained red), which have started to cover the neuron in the same way these cells interact in the brain (20x) by Rebecca Nutbrown

Third place: Brain cells from skin cells—specifically, a culture of neurons (stained green) derived from human skin cells, and Schwann cells, a second type of brain cell (stained red), which have started to cover the neuron in the same way these cells interact in the brain (20x) by Rebecca Nutbrown

 

Fourth place: Butterfly proboscis (6.3x) by Jochen Schroeder

Fourth place: Butterfly proboscis (6.3x) by Jochen Schroeder

 

Fifth place: Front foot (tarsus) of a male diving beetle (100x) by Dr. Igor Siwanowicz

Fifth place: Front foot (tarsus) of a male diving beetle (100x) by Dr. Igor Siwanowicz

 

Sixth place: Air bubbles formed from melted ascorbic acid (vitamin C) crystals (50x) by Marek Miś

Sixth place: Air bubbles formed from melted ascorbic acid (vitamin C) crystals (50x) by Marek Miś

 

Ninth place: Espresso coffee crystals by Vin Kitayama and Sanae Kitayama

Ninth place: Espresso coffee crystals by Vin Kitayama and Sanae Kitayama

 

Eleventh place: Scales of a butterfly wing underside (10x) by Francis Sneyers

Eleventh place: Scales of a butterfly wing underside (10x) by Francis Sneyers

 

Seventeenth place: Slime mold (5x) by José R. Almodóvar

Seventeenth place: Slime mold (5x) by José R. Almodóvar

 

If seeing is believing, then we have a very small fraction of the world to believe in. It’s true that we miss much of what’s available to be seen as a result of our brain not wanting to give us more than we can handle. Carnegie Mellon University psychology and neuroscience assistant professor Timothy Verstynen asserts that as much as 90 percent of what we “see” could be fabricated by our brains. Compared to the limited version of reality we’ve grown accustomed to, processing the inessential would likely be paralyzing—or just plain weird.

Trippy perception theories aside, cutting edge photographic technology has given us a window into realms previously unknown to human perception—and we’re not just talking about faraway planets brought to our smartphone screens by NASA. No, Nikon’s Small World Photomicrography Competition has given us an inside look into a world hidden right before our very eyes. The best part? You can experience these micro-worlds for as long or as little as you like.


- Originally appeared at GOOD.is